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Mass Communication In India By Keval J Kumar: An Ebook Review and Download Link



Mass Communication in India by Keval J Kumar: A Book Review




Mass communication is the process of transmitting information, ideas, opinions, attitudes and emotions to a large and diverse audience through various media channels. It is a vital aspect of any society, especially in a country like India, where diversity, democracy and development are intertwined. Mass communication not only informs, educates and entertains the public, but also influences their beliefs, values and behaviours. It also shapes the public sphere, where citizens can participate in public debate and decision-making.




Mass Communication In India By Keval J Kumar Free Download



However, mass communication is not a simple or straightforward phenomenon. It involves complex interactions among various factors, such as media technologies, media institutions, media professionals, media content, media audiences and media effects. It also reflects the socio-cultural and political-economic contexts in which it operates. Therefore, it requires a critical and comprehensive understanding of its history, theory, practice and implications.


One of the books that attempts to provide such an understanding is Mass Communication in India by Keval J Kumar. The author is a former professor and director of Symbiosis Institute of Mass Communication and a former reader and head of Department of Communication and Journalism at University of Pune. He is also the founder-director of Resource Centre for Media Education and Research (RECMER), Pune. He has over four decades of experience in teaching, research and consultancy in mass communication.


The main argument of the book is that mass communication has played a key role in the emergence and advancement of each of the four industrial revolutions that have transformed human society. Information and communication technologies (ICTs), from book publishing, the press and telegraph to cinema, recorded music, radio, television, computers, the internet and the mobile phone, have accelerated the diffusion and adoption of the many innovations spawned by these revolutions. The book also argues that mass communication in India has evolved in response to the changing socio-cultural and political-economic scenario in India and around the world.


The book consists of 14 chapters that cover various aspects of mass communication in India. Each chapter ends with a comprehensive list of recent publications for further reading. The book also provides several tables, figures and boxes that illustrate key concepts and data. The book is written in a clear and accessible language, with examples and case studies from the Indian context. The book is suitable for students, teachers, researchers and practitioners of mass communication, as well as general readers who are interested in the topic.


Summary of the book




The following is a brief summary of each chapter of the book:


Chapter 1: An Introduction to Mass Communication Theory




This chapter introduces the basic concepts and definitions of mass communication, such as communication, media, message, channel, sender, receiver, feedback, noise and effect. It also explains the functions and models of mass communication, such as the transmission model, the ritual model, the public sphere model and the cultural studies model. It also discusses the major approaches and perspectives of mass communication theory, such as positivism, interpretivism, critical theory and postmodernism. It also outlines the historical development of mass communication theory, from the early 20th century to the present day.


Chapter 2: Journalism: Speaking Truth to Power




This chapter traces the history and evolution of journalism in India, from the colonial period to the contemporary era. It highlights the role of journalism in the freedom struggle, the post-independence nation-building, the emergency period, the liberalization era and the digital age. It also examines the various forms and genres of journalism, such as print journalism, broadcast journalism, online journalism, investigative journalism, citizen journalism and alternative journalism. It also analyzes the issues and challenges faced by journalism in India, such as media ownership, regulation, ethics, professionalism, credibility and social responsibility.


Chapter 3: Cinema: The First Audiovisual Medium




This chapter explores the origin and growth of cinema in India, from the silent era to the sound era. It describes the various genres and styles of Indian cinema, such as mainstream cinema, parallel cinema, regional cinema and new wave cinema. It also discusses the impact of cinema on Indian society and culture, such as nationalism, secularism, modernity, globalization and identity. It also evaluates the problems and prospects of cinema in India, such as censorship, piracy, taxation, exhibition and distribution.


Chapter 4: Radio: The End of Analogue?




This chapter reviews the development and transformation of radio in India, from the pre-independence period to the post-liberalization period. It explains the different types and formats of radio broadcasting in India, such as public service broadcasting, commercial broadcasting and community radio. It also assesses the role and relevance of radio in India's communication landscape, such as education, entertainment, information and empowerment. It also identifies the opportunities and challenges faced by radio in India, such as digitization, convergence, participation and sustainability.


Chapter 5: Television: Cinema for Home and Family




This chapter examines the emergence and expansion of television in India, from the experimental phase to the satellite phase. It illustrates the various genres and categories of television programming in India, such as news, entertainment, sports, education and culture. It also evaluates the influence and implications of television on Indian society and politics, such as consumerism, globalization, nationalism, regionalism and communalism. It also addresses the issues and concerns related to television in India, such as quality, diversity, accessibility, accountability and regulation.


Chapter 6: Music: From Gramophone to Smart Phones




This chapter investigates the history and evolution of music in India, from the traditional forms to the contemporary forms. It describes the various types and sources of music in India, such as classical music, folk music, film music, pop music, rock music, rap music and fusion music. It also analyzes the effects and expressions of music on Indian culture and identity, such as emotion, aesthetics, religion, language, gender and class. It also explores the opportunities and challenges faced by music in India, such as technology, innovation, preservation, promotion and piracy.


Chapter 7: Book Publishing: An Industry Larger than Bollywood




This chapter studies the origin and growth of book publishing in India, from the colonial era to the digital era. It explains the different segments and sectors of book publishing in India, such as academic publishing, trade publishing, educational publishing and self-publishing. It also assesses the role and impact of book publishing on Indian education and culture, such as literacy, knowledge, creativity and diversity. Chapter 8: Folk Media: Alive and Kicking




This chapter explores the origin and diversity of folk media in India, which are the traditional forms of communication that use oral, visual and performative elements to convey messages to local communities. It describes the various types of folk media in India, such as folk songs, folk dances, folk theatre, puppetry, storytelling and painting. It also discusses the functions and significance of folk media in India, such as cultural preservation, social integration, political mobilization and development communication. It also examines the challenges and opportunities faced by folk media in India, such as modernization, globalization, recognition and support.


Chapter 9: Advertising and Public Relations: Engines of Media Growth




This chapter investigates the development and role of advertising and public relations in India, which are the specialized forms of communication that aim to persuade and influence target audiences for various purposes. It explains the different components and processes of advertising and public relations, such as research, planning, execution and evaluation. It also evaluates the impact and implications of advertising and public relations on Indian media and society, such as media economics, media content, consumer behaviour and public opinion. It also addresses the ethical and legal issues related to advertising and public relations in India, such as social responsibility, self-regulation and consumer protection.


Chapter 10: Mass Communication and Society: Social Science Perspectives




This chapter examines the relationship between mass communication and society from various social science perspectives, such as sociology, psychology, anthropology and political science. It analyzes how mass communication affects different aspects of society, such as culture, ideology, identity, power and change. It also analyzes how society affects different aspects of mass communication, such as media production, media consumption, media representation and media regulation. It also reviews some of the key theories and concepts that have been used to study mass communication and society, such as cultural imperialism, hegemony, agenda-setting, framing and cultivation.


Chapter 11: Media Audiences: Uses, Effects and Representations




This chapter focuses on the role and nature of media audiences in India, which are the people who receive, interpret and respond to media messages. It explores the different ways of understanding and measuring media audiences, such as demographics, psychographics, ratings and analytics. It also explores the different ways of studying and explaining media audiences, such as uses and gratifications, media effects, reception analysis and audience studies. It also explores the different ways of representing and engaging media audiences, such as stereotypes, genres, narratives and interactivity.


Chapter 12: Development Communication: Communication for Social Change




This chapter studies the concept and practice of development communication in India, which is the use of communication for social change in various domains, such as health, education, environment, agriculture and governance. It traces the historical evolution of development communication in India, from the top-down approach to the bottom-up approach. It describes the different models and strategies of development communication in India, such as diffusion, participation, empowerment and advocacy. It also evaluates the role and impact of development communication in India, such as awareness, behaviour change, social mobilization and policy influence.


Chapter 13: IT, Telecommunications and the Internet: Convergent and Multi-Platform




This chapter examines the emergence and growth of IT, telecommunications and the internet in India, which are the technologies that enable the convergence and multi-platforming of media content and services. It explains the different aspects and features of IT, telecommunications and the internet in India, such as infrastructure, accessibility, affordability, connectivity and innovation. It also assesses the influence and implications of IT, telecommunications and the internet on Indian media and society, such as digitization, diversification, interactivity, personalization and democratization.


Chapter 14: Mass Media, Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and the Public Domain




This chapter explores the relationship between mass media, intellectual property rights (IPR) and the public domain in India, which are the legal and ethical issues that govern the creation, protection, distribution and consumption of media content. It describes the different types and categories of IPR in India, such as copyright, trademark, patent, design and geographical indication. It also describes the different sources and forms of the public domain in India, such as fair use, public interest, open access, open source and creative commons. It also identifies the challenges and opportunities faced by mass media, IPR and the public domain in India, such as piracy, plagiarism, innovation, collaboration and regulation.


Critical analysis of the book




The following is a brief critical analysis of the book:


Strengths of the book




The book has several strengths that make it a valuable and comprehensive resource for understanding mass communication in India. Some of these strengths are:



  • It covers a wide range of topics and issues related to mass communication in India, from theory to practice, from history to future, from media to society, from education to entertainment, from culture to politics, from technology to law.



  • It provides a balanced and nuanced perspective on mass communication in India, acknowledging its achievements and challenges, its opportunities and threats, its strengths and weaknesses, its diversity and unity, its continuity and change.



  • It adopts a critical and analytical approach to mass communication in India, questioning its assumptions and implications, its benefits and costs, its roles and responsibilities, its potentials and limitations, its opportunities and challenges.



  • It incorporates recent and relevant data and examples from the Indian context, reflecting the current trends and developments in mass communication in India, such as digital media, social media, online platforms, mobile applications, e-commerce, OTT services, etc.



  • It uses a clear and accessible language and style, with tables, figures and boxes that illustrate key concepts and data. It also provides a comprehensive list of references for further reading at the end of each chapter.



Limitations of the book




The book also has some limitations that could be improved or addressed in future editions. Some of these limitations are:



  • It does not provide enough depth and detail on some topics and issues related to mass communication in India, such as media literacy, media ethics, media policy, media research, media education, media activism, etc.



  • It does not provide enough comparison and contrast with other countries and regions in terms of mass communication practices and experiences, such as China, USA, Europe, Latin America, Africa, etc.



  • It does not provide enough reflection and evaluation on the future prospects and challenges of mass communication in India in the context of the global pandemic, climate change, social movements, digital transformation, etc.



  • It does not provide enough exercises and activities for students and teachers to apply and test their knowledge and understanding of mass communication in India.



  • It does not provide enough online resources and materials to supplement and enhance the learning experience of mass communication in India.



Suggestions for improvement




The book could be improved or updated in future editions by incorporating some of the following suggestions:



  • It could provide more depth and detail on some topics and issues related to mass communication in India by adding more sub-sections or chapters on them.



  • It could provide more comparison and contrast with other countries and regions in terms of mass communication practices and experiences by adding more examples or case studies on them.



  • It could provide more reflection and evaluation on the future prospects and challenges of mass communication in India by adding more scenarios or projections on them.



  • It could provide more exercises and activities for students and teachers to apply and test their knowledge and understanding of mass communication in India by adding more questions or assignments on them.



  • It could provide more online resources and materials to supplement and enhance the learning experience of mass communication in India by creating a website or an app for them.



Conclusion




FAQs on Mass Communication in India




Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) on mass communication in India and their answers:



  • What are the eligibility criteria and entrance exams for mass communication courses in India?



The eligibility criteria and entrance exams for mass communication courses in India vary depending on the level, duration and institution of the course. However, some of the common requirements are:


  • For undergraduate courses (such as BA, BSc, BJMC, etc.), candidates should have completed 10+2 or equivalent examination from a recognized board with a minimum of 50% marks in aggregate. Some of the entrance exams for undergraduate courses are IPU CET, DUET, SET, etc.



  • For postgraduate courses (such as MA, MSc, MJMC, etc.), candidates should have completed a bachelor's degree or equivalent examination from a recognized university with a minimum of 50% marks in aggregate. Some of the entrance exams for postgraduate courses are IIMC Entrance Exam, JMI Entrance Exam, XIC OET, etc.



  • For diploma and certificate courses (such as PG Diploma, PG Certificate, etc.), candidates should have completed a bachelor's degree or equivalent examination from a recognized university with a minimum of 50% marks in aggregate. Some of the entrance exams for diploma and certificate courses are FTII Entrance Exam, SRFTI Entrance Exam, NIMCET, etc.



  • What are the career options and salary prospects for mass communication graduates in India?



The career options and salary prospects for mass communication graduates in India depend on various factors, such as the type and level of qualification, the field and sector of specialization, the experience and skills of the candidate, the location and reputation of the employer, etc. However, some of the common career options and salary prospects for mass communication graduates in India are:


  • Journalist: A journalist is a professional who gathers, writes and reports news and information for various media outlets, such as newspapers, magazines, television channels, radio stations and websites. The average salary of a journalist in India is around Rs. 3.5 lakh per annum.



  • Advertising Executive: An advertising executive is a professional who plans, creates and executes advertising campaigns for various products and services for various media platforms, such as print, broadcast and digital. The average salary of an advertising executive in India is around Rs. 4 lakh per annum.



  • Public Relations Officer: A public relations officer is a professional who manages and enhances the image and reputation of a company or organization by communicating with various stakeholders, such as media, customers, investors and employees. The average salary of a public relations officer in India is around Rs. 4.5 lakh per annum.



  • Broadcasting Engineer: A broadcasting engineer is a professional who designs, installs and maintains the technical equipment and systems used for broadcasting audio and video signals for various media platforms, such as radio, television and digital. The average salary of a broadcasting engineer in India is around Rs. 5 lakh per annum.



Digital Media Specialist: A digital media specialist is a professional who creates, manages and optimizes the content and strategies for v


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